FALKLANDS, SOUTH GEORGIA AND ANTARCTIC PENINSULA  

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20 DAYS

ITINERARY SUMMARY
DayPlaceHighlights
Day 1SantiagoSpend the night in Santiago before your flight to Puerto Williams
Day 2Puerto WilliamsFly into Puerto Williams, set sail, and meet the expedition team
Day 3At SeaEnjoy the facilities onboard, fine dining options, welcome cocktail party
Day 4New Island and West Point islandExcursions ashore, hiking, soaring cliffs, towering coastal precipices and Commerson's dolphin, afternoon tea with locals on New Island
Day 5Port StanleyWindswept landscape, Docklands Museum, five species of penguins nest here during mating season (including the rare rockhopper penguin)
Days 6 - 7At SeaEnjoy the facilities onboard, fine dining options, welcome cocktail party
Days 8 - 10South GeorgiaWildlife extravaganza on the island- albatross, king and macaroni penguins.
Days 11 - 12At SeaRelax visit the spa or gym, whale watching and attend
Day 13Elephant IslandEndurance glacier, Shackleton's monument and follow in the footsteps of the brave explorers
Days 14 - 16Antarctic PeninsulaExplore this main peninsula of the spectacular southernmost continent
Day 17South Shetland IslandsSouth Shetland Chinstrap, Adelie, Gentoo and Macaroni Penguins, Leopard seals, Weddell seals, crabeater seals, Southern elephant seals and Antarctic fur seals
Day 18 - 19Drake Passage and Cape HornCross this iconic stretch of ocean notoriously known as turbulent seas or calm like a lake, arrive Peurto Williams
Day 20Puerto WilliamsDisembark, farewelling fellow travellers and expedition crew, fly back to Santiago
Antarctica and Falklands

SHIP OFFERING THIS ITINERARY

SILVER WIND
Silver Wind Butler Crew

The Silver Wind is a modern comfortable ship which has undergone refurbishments in December 2018 with a second planned for summer 2020 after her original build in 1995. Timelessly elegant and luxurious, the Silver Wind is enabled to comfortably carry 254 passengers (240 on Polar voyages) across her 6 passenger decks. Her new and improved strengthened ice-class hull makes for adaptable sailing through the Polar Regions with ease for whatever the conditions may bring.

SILVER CLOUD

Spacious yet intimate, the yacht-like Silver Cloud carries 240 guests in incomparable comfort and style combining spacious ocean-view suites and private verandas with excellent dining and entertainment options. Silver Cloud epitomizes a vision of world-class cruise accommodations, cuisine, service and amenities.

The Silver Cloud is equipped with a fleet of zodiacs and expert guides to escort you on excursions from the ship.

SILVER ENDEAVOUR

The Silver Endeavour brings new meaning to luxury in the Antarctic. Featuring 100 breathtaking suites to accompany up to 200 guests, you may never want your time on board to end. The ships sleek design fits all the specifications of Polar Class 6 enabling the Silver Endeavour to reach the farthest corners of the Earth. The features on board seem somewhat endless. There’s a two story glass-enclosed solarium for relaxing as you watch the beautiful scenery pass you by or get a treatment at the full-service spa. Choose to dine from one of the six Michelin-level restaurants on board or spend sea days in one of the many other on board lavish public places. The ship is set to have a whole fleet of expedition toys including a fleet of 18 zodiacs, a submersible and two helicopters ready to take you on an adventure.

Day 1 Santiago, Chile

santiago, chile

Spend the night in Santiago before your flight to Puerto Williams the following day. Spend this day at your own leisure, exploring the city of Santiago or preparing for the adventure to come.

Day 2 Puerto Williams

Fly from Santiago to Puerto Williams.

Puerto Williams is a Chilean city located on Navarino Island on the southern shores of the Beagle Channel. It claims to be the “southernmost city in the world”, however owing to its small size – 2500 residents approximately – the much larger Argentinean city of Ushuaia, which sits on the northern side of the same channel, also claims that title. The surrounding scenery is magnificent. The city itself has the dramatic backdrop called “Dientes de Navarino” (literally “teeth of Navarino”), which rival the famous Torres del Paine further to the north. The current city was established as a naval base in 1953 and honours the British-Chilean naval commander John Williams Wilson of the 16th century. Initially it served to protect territorial possessions and fishing rights of the area, as well as offering logistical support to Antarctic bases. More recently it has become a departure point for scientific and tourism trips to the Antarctic region. In contrast to the bustle and traffic of a very commercial Ushuaia, Puerto Williams offers a quieter, more relaxed experience. It charms the visitor with a small village feel, complete with rustic buildings and the homely smell of drifting wood smoke. A haven of peace at the end of the world.

Embark on your voyage to Antarctica. After a chance to explore and settle into your cabin, you will meet your fellow travellers.

Day 3 At Sea

Silver Wind Outdoor Dining

The Expedition Team will present talks about the Falkland Islands (Malvinas -as the Spanish-speaking world calls them) that will prepare you for the exciting adventures ahead.  Birders out on deck want to keep an eye out for Black-browed Albatross, Southern Giant Petrels and Cape Petrels.

Taking advantage of the day at sea, the Expedition Team will present talks about the Falkland Islands (Malvinas -as the Spanish-speaking world calls them) that will prepare you for the exciting adventures ahead.  Birders out on deck want to keep an eye out for Black-browed Albatross, Southern Giant Petrels and Cape Petrels.

Days at sea are perfect for relaxing, whether that is reading a book, going to the gym, visiting the spa and whale watching. It’s the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 4 New Island and West Point Island

Black-browed on nest dome Alex
Royal Penguins and Southern Elephant Seals

Lying to the west of the Falkland Islands, and the humble human population here is far outweighed by the extraordinary birdlife that resides along its craggy coastline. Out in the tempestuous wilds of the South Atlantic Ocean, the island is a sanctuary of animal life – with crowds of rockhopper penguins, wrinkled seals and stern-looking albatross among its many residents. The penguins of the Falklands are a sight to see, fooling and falling on the beaches, before diving in and whipping through the waters. Home to five different species, including king penguins – who strut with their orange collars glowing against the pure white feathers of their chests. Sea lions, seals and elephant seals bark and lumber along the shoreline, while sleek orcas patrol and Peale’s dolphins cut through the waves. Settlement Rookery’s cliffs rattle with the sounds of crashing sea waves, and the echoing shouts of hollering black-browed albatross, king cormorants and rockhopper penguins. Enjoy gorgeous sweeping landscapes, littered with shipwrecks and sprinkles of colourful wildflowers. A warm welcome is guaranteed, especially when the local custom of smoko is served up – towering platters of cakes and biscuits with tea and coffee. Things haven’t always been so peaceful here, however, and you can pay a visit to the battlefields and memorials of the costly war in 1982, when the British and Argentinians clashed fiercely over these islands.

A north-westerly outpost of the scenic Falkland Islands, you’ll be welcomed ashore by the calls and cries of a huge colony of black-browed albatross. Indeed, the island was originally known as Albatross Island before being renamed to reflect its geographic location. While the albatrosses – that flash white feathers in the rugged cliffs above the waves – are the most well known residents, they are far from the only animal inhabitants of this remote, isolated land. A huge army of birdlife calls the island sanctuary home, overwhelming the tiny human population and sheep that roam West Point Island’s grasses. Meet rockhopper penguins along the coast’s boulders and imperial cormorants seen here in great numbers. Likely encounters with Magellanic penguins during your explorations. Hike the island’s quiet landscapes, and look out for endemic plants like Felton’s flower carpeting the green interior. Decorated with some of the archipelago’s most dramatic scenery, explore this wind-lashed, distant land of soaring cliffs and towering coastal precipices. Cliff Mountain is the island’s standout – a towering sandstone monolith, and the archipelago’s highest cliff, falling away to swirling waves below. Look out for Commerson’s dolphin, whales also visit and fur seals.

Day 5 Port Stanley

Stanley, Falkland Islands

Despite it being a stalwart of Britishness, Stanley more resembles Patagonia than Portsmouth. But, despite the windswept, vast and achingly beautiful landscape of the Falkland Islands, don’t be too surprised to find the odd pub serving ales and even fish’n’chips. While landmarks such as Christ Church Cathedral, with its whalebone arch are 100% local, there is a also good smattering of imported garden gnomes and Union Jacks to remind you whose territory you are really on. The Falkland Islands’ ownership has long been a matter of controversy, ever since colonisation in the 18th century. At various points in their life they have been considered French, British, Spanish and Argentine. The Falklands War in 1982, despite only lasting for a short while, proved that the Brits clung to this remote outpost and the islands remain part of the British Commonwealth today. Margaret Thatcher, under whom the war was masterminded, remains something of a local hero as can be seen in the street signs (such as Thatcher Drive). For those who want to dig deeper into the past, the Historic Docklands Museum provides lots of information on the chequered historical and political background of the Falklands. However, the true heroes of Stanley are of course the thousands and thousands of penguins. Five species nest here during mating season (including the rare rockhopper penguin). There are virtually no barriers between you and the wildlife; allowing for a truly interactive, authentic and totally unforgettable experience.

Days 6 – 7 At Sea

Silver Wind Ocean View

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or relaxing, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Days 8 – 10 South Georgia

South Georgia

South Georgia is a breathtaking destination of towering snow-covered mountains, mighty glaciers, and low-lying grasslands that attract an astounding concentration of wildlife. It is possible to find Southern fur seals, Southern elephant seals and a variety of albatross species including Black-browed, Light-mantled Sooty, Grey-headed and the spectacular Wandering Albatross, plus thousands of King and Macaroni Penguins. South Georgia is also linked to the early Antarctic explorers. Captain James Cook first stepped ashore in 1775, but perhaps more famous is Ernest Shackleton’s arrival in 1916 following the sinking of his ship Endurance. Shackleton’s grave and the whaling museum at Grytviken are highlights, as would be a visit to one of the King Penguin colonies at Salisbury Plain or Gold Harbour.

Days 11 – 12 At Sea

seals underwater antarctica

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or relaxing, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 13 Elephant Island

Weddell Seal

Awesome glaciers flecked with pink algae can be seen approaching Elephant Island — so named either for its elephant-like appearance or for sightings of elephant seals here. Elephant Island is home to several Chinstrap Penguin rookeries, as well as 2,000-year-old moss colonies. Weddell seals and Macaroni Penguins can also be spotted. In 1916, when Ernest Shackleton’s ship Endurance was crushed in pack ice in the Weddell Sea, the crew was stranded here for more than 4 months finding shelter under two upturned lifeboats on the spit of land Shackleton’s men named ‘Point Wild’. The bust of the Chilean captain Luis Pardo has been erected here to commemorate the successful rescue in the tug Yelcho.

Days 14 – 16 Antarctic Sound and Peninsula

The Antarctic Sound is a stretch of water named after the first ship to have passed through this body of water from the Bransfield Strait to the Weddell Sea in 1902. The Antarctic eventually sank and crew and scientists had to spend quite some time in this area before they could be rescued. Sites that have to do with this story – like Hope Bay or Paulet Island – are hopefully visited if conditions allow. At Paulet, Hope Bay and Brown Bluff Adelie and Gentoo Penguins breed, as do Kelp Gulls and Cape Petrels, Snow Petrels and Skuas. The Sound’s main attractions are the spectacular tabular icebergs that come from the Larsen Ice Shelf further south.

Day 17 South Shetland Islands

Gentoo Penguins

Some 770 kilometers south of Cape Horn, the South Shetland Islands are usually the first land seen in Antarctica. Separated from the Antarctic Peninsula by the Bransfield Strait, nine major islands make up the group. The region was the first to be exploited by sealers in the early 19th century, and because of its proximity to South America, it still is the most visited by scientists and tourists. Chinstrap, Adelie, Gentoo and Macaroni Penguins all breed here. In addition, because it is the warmest part of the continent, large moss beds as well as orange, black, grey and green lichens grow –even hair grass and pearlwort manage to survive. Leopard seals, Weddell seals, crabeater seals, Southern elephant seals and Antarctic fur seals can be seen in the water and on the beaches.

Days 18 – 19 Drake Passage and Cape Horn

Crossing the Drake

The Drake Passage has a notorious reputation for its turbulent seas due to the westerly winds and the funneling effect of the passage. The Antarctic Convergence, a natural boundary where cold polar water flows northward and warmer equatorial water moves southward, is within the Drake Passage. When these two currents meet, nutrients are pushed to the surface, often attracting a multitude of seabirds and whales. Black-browed Albatross, Sooty Shearwaters and White-chinned Petrels glide in the air currents alongside and in the wake of the ship.

Day 20 Puerto Williams

Puerto Williams offers a quiet and relaxed experience, charming visitors with a small village feel, complete with rustic buildings and the homely smell of drifting wood smoke. A haven of peace at the end of the world.

After breakfast, disembark the ship and transfer for your return flight to Santiago.

Expedition highlights and wildlife listed here are possible experiences only and cannot be guaranteed. Your Expedition Leader and Captain will work together to ensure opportunities for adventure and exploration are the best possible, taking into account the prevailing weather, wildlife activity and ice conditions. Expedition Team members scheduled for this voyage are subject to change or cancellation.

A flexible itinerary allows us to take advantage of favourable sea and weather conditions. In the true spirit of expedition cruising, each day the Expedition Leader and Captain will determine our best course depending on weather, ice conditions and wildlife we may encounter.

To book this voyage call 1300 784 794 or email contact@antarcticatravelcentre.com.au

We will tailor the perfect holiday to suit your needs.

Extend your trip to Patagonia

To make the most of your time in South America we can tailor a holiday to Patagonia to suit your voyage dates. If you have a bit more time we can create a tailor-made itinerary to some of the highlights of South America. Take a look at the Patagonia sample itineraries below and contact us to begin creating your perfect holiday.